Friday, September 22, 2017

Pirate Radio and Sealand

Beatlemania. A teenage girl, eyes closed and screaming while enraptured by the Beatles and concert. Pirate Radio and Sealand and Other stories of Rock, Radio, and Regulations. Marchmatron.com
We got into music to avoid a job, and get lots of girls. 

- Paul McCartney

In the 60's the British Broadcasting Corp owned the airwaves and they were NOT having the rock 'n' roll revolution . . .
Two Beatles fans, dressing identically, screaming at a concert. Shea Stadium, Queens, New York 1965. Pirate Radio and Sealand and Other stories of Rock, Radio, and Regulations. Marchmatron.com
We don’t like their sound, and guitar music is on the way out.
- Decca Records’ rejection letter to The Beatles, 1962
because look at America. 
Young Beatles fan, sobbing while clutching a tuft of grass which Ringo walked on. Pirate Radio and Sealand and Other stories of Rock, Radio, and Regulations. Marchmatron.com
So this is America.
They all seem to be out of their minds.
- Ringo
Just look at it. 
American policemen holding back young Rolling Stones fans in New York 1964. Pirate Radio and Sealand and Other stories of Rock, Radio, and Regulations. Marchmatron.com
There's no absolutes in life - only vodka.
- Mick Jagger


On the BBC, six hours of "pop music" a week was allowed, AFTER passing censorship and approval . . . . 
Young Elvis fans Mar. 28, 1957, screaming while watching Elvis perform. Pirate Radio and Sealand and Other stories of Rock, Radio, and Regulations. Marchmatron.com
I don’t know anything about music. In my line, you don’t have to.- Elvis Presley

because really,  
A swarm of hysterical young Beatles fans react to their arrival in New York on Feb 07, 1964. Pirate Radio and Sealand and Other stories of Rock, Radio, and Regulations. Marchmatron.com
I'd rather be dead than singing 'Satisfaction' when I'm forty-five.
- Mick Jagger
have you seen America?
The Beatles, 1964 American Tour. Police officer with his fingers in his years with an audience of young girls screaming at the concert. Atlantic City, New Jersey Convention Hall. Pirate Radio and Sealand. Marchmatron.com
Rock 'n' roll will never die.
There'll always be some arrogant little brat who wants to make music with a guitar.
- Dave Edmunds
Ironically, the British invasion did more than just look . . .  
Young girls, screaming fans at an Elivis Jacksonville concert.1950s. Life magazine photo. Pirate Radio and Sealand and Other stories of Rock, Radio, and Regulations. Marchmatron.com
The reason kids like rock 'n roll is their parents don't. - Mitch Miller
and Amercian youth did what American youth does . . . 
Young girl holding binoculars, sobbing at a Beatles concert. I still love the Beatles pin and Beatles and Hearts shirt. Pirate Radio and Sealand and Other stories of Rock, Radio, and Regulations. Marchmatron.com
Being in the audience actually looks like quite a lot of fun. - Paul McCartney

went mental and made some people very, very rich. 
Mod photo of a woman’s body in a mini dress, sitting on sofa in graphic print, listening to singles on a small record player. Pirate Radio and Sealand and Other stories of Rock, Radio, and Regulations. Marchmatron.com
Apparently, rock and roll liberated the pelvis and it hasn't been the same since.
- Emma Thompson
The dilemma for Brits opposed to The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, and other debauchery, was an inability to control what happened past British territorial limits.
Promotional photo movie Pirate Radio the Ship that Rocked. Dancing on the ship deck. The worst mismatch of supply and demand in history. 2009. Pirate Radio and Sealand and Other stories of Rock, Radio, and Regulations. Marchmatron.com
Pirate Radio, The Boat That Rocked
Vessels of questionable sea-worthiness and abandoned ocean platforms became offshore pirate radio stations.

Radio Caroline is a British radio station founded in 1964 by Ronan O'Rahilly to circumvent the BBC's radio broadcasting monopoly. Pirate Radio and Sealand and Other stories of Rock, Radio, and Regulations. Marchmatron.com
Radio Caroline
At dinner, the captain . . . said, 'Just for Dave's benefit, we'll have to go through the lifeboat drill.' . . . 
I'd only been asleep for a couple of hours when the alarm went off. I got out of bed, was about to put my trousers on when someone grabbed my hand and said, 'No time for that, quick quick!' 
So I was in my underpants in the North Sea, I went up to my post by a boat on top deck and I stood there almost naked, freezing my arse off, waiting for instructions. 
After five minutes, I thought, Nobody's given me orders, I can't hear anything, this is crazy – and as I went downstairs, I heard muffled laughter. It was a first-night wind-up. I unloosed a lot of expletives. - Dave Lee Travis, pirate radio DJ
The acoustics were terrible and records would skip when the ships bobbed. 
BBC DJ Dave Lee Travis, originally a Pirate Radio DJ, smoking a mini bong. Pirate Radio and Sealand and Other stories of Rock, Radio, and Regulations. Marchmatron.com
Dave Lee Travis, pirate radio DJ
When the weather was really rough, we had to attach an old two-shilling piece on to the arm of the record player to keep the needle weighted down on the record against all the pitching and tossing. And when it got really bad out there, we'd call it a Half-Crown Day.- Dave Lee Travis, pirate radio DJ 
The DJs became celebrities. 
Dave Cash, Pirate Radio DJ. You had no real idea of what you were doing until you came ashore. Pirate Radio and Sealand and Other stories of Rock, Radio, and Regulations. Marchmatron.com
Dave Cash, DJ for Radio London


The stations were also able to tap into advertising funds, something the BBC did not do.
DJ Tom Lodge in the tiny Caroline studio on board the Mi Amigo in 1966. Pirate Radio and Sealand and Other stories of Rock, Radio, and Regulations. Marchmatron.com
DJ Tom Lodge explained why women were banned.
In August 1967, the government implemented the Marine Broadcasting Offences Act, making it illegal to work on, supply or advertise on pirate ships which killed the stations.
Pirate radio DJs went to work for the BBC. Dave Cash (fourth from the left) and his group of ex-pirate DJs. Pirate Radio and Sealand and Other stories of Rock, Radio, and Regulations. Marchmatron.com
Pirate DJs become BBC DJs
The BBC set up its pop channel Radio One in 1967 and recruited many of the pirate DJs.
Recent photo of WWII platform, The Principality of Sealand, a micronation. Pirate Radio and Sealand and Other stories of Rock, Radio, and Regulations. Marchmatron.com

The Principality of Sealand, a micronation, is a remanent of pirate radio.
Fort Roughs, WWII British ocean defense platform being towed out to sea for placement. Pirate Radio and Sealand and Other stories of Rock, Radio, and Regulations. Marchmatron.com
HM Fort Roughs WWII
HM Fort Roughs, is an abandoned WWII anti-aircraft gun platform, off the coast of Suffolk, England. In the 1960's, pirate radio broadcaster Paddy Roy Bates ejected a competing pirate radio operator from the platform and declared that the structure was an independent nation-state.

Prince Patty Roy Bates and Princess Joan of Sealand. 1970s. Pirate Radio and Sealand and Other stories of Rock, Radio, and Regulations. Marchmatron.com
Princess Joan of Sealand
Bates, now the prince of his own nation, decided not to continue broadcasting. Instead, he created a national flag, stamps, currency, and constitution.
A few years later, after thwarting an occupation effort by another pirate radio broadcaster, Roy and his son Michael were arrested on weapons charges. The courts ruled that the area was outside of the British territorial limits.
The 1978 armed invasion of Sealand by a German businessman, Alexander Achenbach. Three armed men on the Sealand platform. Pirate Radio and Sealand and Other stories of Rock, Radio, and Regulations. Marchmatron.com
The Sealand invasion.
In 1978, a German businessman, Alexander Achenbach, calling himself Prime Minister of Sealand, invaded platform and took Bates's son, Michael, hostage. Bates launched a counterattack and held Achenbach and company as prisoners of war.

Germany then sent a diplomat to Britain to ask for intervention but Britain claimed they did not have jurisdiction. Germany then sent a diplomat to Sealand directly to negotiate their release.

Roy Bates, on Sealand, flag flying in the background. I might die young or I might die old but I will never die of boredom.  Pirate Radio and Sealand and Other stories of Rock, Radio, and Regulations. Marchmatron.com
Roy Bates stands under the Sealand Flag
In 1987, the UK extended its territorial waters from 3 to 12 nautical miles moving Sealand inside British jurisdiction. 150,000 Sealand passports were revoked.
An attempt was made to sell Sealand in 2007 but the $900 million asking price was evidently beyond the market for a WWII platform nation-state.
Recent photo of Michael Bates, Prince Regent, motoring away from Sealand. Sealand motto from the sea, liberty.  Pirate Radio and Sealand and Other stories of Rock, Radio, and Regulations. Marchmatron.com
Michael Bates, Prince Regent of Sealand
Roy Bates died in 2012 leaving his son Michael as the royal heir.
The Principality continues to sell a variety of items including titles of nobility and publishes an online newspaper, Sealand News 
Recent photo of the Principality of Sealand. An armed guard wearing a Sealand Security shirt stands on the platform.  Pirate Radio and Sealand and Other stories of Rock, Radio, and Regulations. Marchmatron.com
Protecting the micronation Sealand 

Sealand is currently occupied by a caretaker. 


#RocknRoll #Radio #RollingStones #Beatles #Band
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www.marchmatron.com/2017/09/stevie-and-ray.html
Stevie and Ray


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